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Science

A new image of a black hole’s magnetic fields will help us understand the massive jets of energy black holes launch into the universe

Black holes don’t just swallow matter. They also spit it out. From their polar regions, they can launch massive jets of energetic plasma that travel at nearly the speed of light, stretch longer than our galaxy and last for many millions of years. Scientists who are part of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project have announced they’ve imaged the magnetic …

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According to a new study, PREGNANT MOMS’ SARS-COV-2 ANTIBODIES PASS TO NEWBORNS

The findings suggest that mothers who have had COVID-19, or asymptomatic exposure to the coronavirus, can provide some protection against the virus to their newborns through this antibody transfer. The authors of the new paper in JAMA Pediatrics hypothesize this may have implications for COVID-19 vaccines. Antibodies to the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in the blood of pregnant women cross the placenta …

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Researchers have identified a key factor in mental aging using Immune Cell

They’ve also shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system’s front-line soldiers. Certain cells of our immune system become increasingly irascible as we grow older. Instead of stamping out embers, they stoke the flames of chronic inflammation. Biologists have long theorized that reducing this inflammation could slow the aging process and delay …

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People go to bed later and sleep less On nights before a full moon

In the new paper, researchers report that sleep cycles in people oscillate during the 29.5-day lunar cycle: In the days leading up to a full moon, people go to sleep later in the evening and sleep for shorter periods of time. The researchers observed these variations in both the time of sleep onset and the duration of sleep in urban …

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A new algorithm enables robots to put pen to paper, writing words using stroke patterns similar to human handwriting

It’s a step, the researchers say, toward robots that are able to communicate more fluently with human coworkers and collaborators. “Just by looking at a target image of a word or sketch, the robot can reproduce each stroke as one continuous action,” says Atsunobu Kotani, an undergraduate student at Brown University who led the algorithm’s development. “That makes it hard …

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New research defines what kids mean when they say technology is “creepy”

Children in the study described creepy technology as something that is unpredictable or poses an ambiguous threat that might cause physical harm or threaten an important relationship. The researchers also pinpoint five aspects of emerging technologies that could contribute to this feeling of ambiguity. “Over the years of working with kids we realized they use the word ‘creepy’ a lot …

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New research digs into how augmented reality affects people’s behavior—in both the physical world and a digitally enhanced one.

Researchers found that after people had an experience in augmented reality (AR)—which goggles that layer computer-generated content onto real-world environments simulated—their interactions in their physical world changed as well, even when they weren’t wearing the AR device. For example, people avoided sitting on a chair they had just seen a virtual person sit on. AFTER AUGMENTED REALITY, THE VIRTUAL WORLD …

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new molecule ‘cage’ that extracts salt to clean drinking water

As reported in Science, researchers designed the molecule to capture chloride, which forms when the element chlorine pairs with another element to gain an electron. The most familiar chloride salt is sodium chloride, or common table salt. Other chloride salts are potassium chloride, calcium chloride, and ammonium chloride. The seepage of salt into freshwater systems reduces access to drinkable water across …

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All Neurons Work To Form Our Sense of Texture

Our hands and fingertips are amazingly sensitive to texture. We can easily distinguish coarse sandpaper from smooth glass, but we also pick up more subtle differences across a wide range of textures, like the slick sheen of silk or the soft give of cotton. The somatosensory cortex is the part of the brain responsible for interpreting the sense of touch. …

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